Posts Tagged ‘Warre hive’

January 14, 2013...a beautiful warm day brought the bees out to the heather.  I saw very few honeybees, but very many bombus Melanopygus (this one) and also Bombus vosnesenskii (yellow-faced bumbles)

January 14, 2013…a beautiful warm day brought the bees out to the heather. I saw very few honeybees, but very many bombus Melanopygus (this one) and also Bombus vosnesenskii (yellow-faced bumbles)
Here you can see the pollen release.  When the bee gets the nectar, the pollen shoots out.

Here you can see the pollen release. When the bee gets the nectar, the pollen shoots out.

As she grooms herself with her front legs, you can see what looks to be a static electricity charge on her bee fuzz...shows up better on the video.

As she grooms herself with her front legs, you can see what looks to be a static electricity charge on her bee fuzz…it shows up better on the video.

This short video shows a bumblebee (bombus Melanopygus) sipping nectar from heather in mid January.  As she sips, pollen can be seen shooting out.  Later she grooms herself.  I noticed what looked to be a static electricity charge when her front legs combed her fuzzy head.

I didn’t want to interrupt the music so I added some video of my Bee-atrice log hive which didn’t make it through the sub freezing weather.   I looked at a comb which had some capped honey as well as uncapped cells.  I replaced the comb in the hopes that this hive will attract a swarm in spring.

It should be raining sideways this month.  It’s not.  After our cold snap, we’ve been enjoying daytime temperatures in the 50’s and 60’s F. (10’s and 20’s C)  When I filmed this it was 71 F. (22 C).  Our honeybees love it.  They are bringing back yellow and orange pollen.  I can’t figure where they’re getting it because the pussy willows aren’t blooming yet, but traffic is heavy as can bee seen on the video.

This is my second winter with bees.  They don’t fly when it’s raining of course, but we do get breaks in the rain, the sun pops out and the bees are flying.  I feel bad for the beekeepers that must tuck their charges to bed in the autumn and trust they will emerge when the weather warms up sometimes months later.  I’m talking about people like Emily Heath among others in cold far away places. 🙂 I guess you could say I’m spoiled to be able to see them active during the winter.   I don’t know what will happen in spring.  It’s possible we’ll get our rain then…given the choice, I’d rather get it now.  In any case the bees are making use of the warm weather.

How are your bees?

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December 27...Bees in Bee Beard Log Hive have found a pollen source late in the year.

December 27…Bees in Bee Beard Log Hive have found a pollen source late in the year.  Natural comb can be seen in the rear.  In the video, the bees can be seen entering the hive and moving downward in front of the comb.

December 27...Warre Hive is being fed with a dry sugar mix consisting of green tea, chamomile tea, nettle leaf extract oil, and a few other little gems.  The sugar was placed on a 2" x 2" frame and positioned between the brood box and the quilt box, then sealed with red tape.

December 27…Warre Hive is being fed with a dry sugar mix consisting of green tea, chamomile tea, nettle leaf extract oil, cane sugar, and a few other little gems. The sugar was placed on a 2″ x 2″ frame and positioned between the brood box and the quilt box, then sealed with red tape.  I’m not real excited about  feeding sugar to the bees.  It’s possible that I won’t do that next year, but that’s what I said last year too.  It’s the only hive that is being fed this year.

December 27...Even this little hive was flying today.  The pink insulation is meant to cut the cold wind, but it still lets the hive breathe through the quilt box on top.

December 27…Even this little hive was flying today. The pink insulation is meant to cut the cold wind, but it still lets the hive breathe through the quilt box on top.

Status of hives one year ago

This short video shows the bees bringing in gobs of orange pollen.

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This beautiful box of honeycomb is 'welded' to the box below...to move it, I've got to cut the bottom of the comb.  I'd like to do it without damaging it or killing bees.

This beautiful box of honeycomb is ‘welded’ to the box below…to move it, I’ve got to cut the bottom of the comb. I’d like to do it without damaging it or killing bees.

I only wanted to switch the third box (full of honeycomb) with the top box which was empty.  The box of honeycomb was blocking the empty, so it made sense to swap…but the honeycomb was attached to the bars in the box below.  If I just pried the box up, I might tear the combs apart leading to a real mess.  I consulted the forums…Bernhard suggests cracking the boxes a bit then taking a thin wire to slice through the bottoms of the combs to lift the box out.

I wound some stainless steel wire around some cut broomstick ends.  I'll see-saw it back and forth to cut through comb.

I wound a short length of  stainless steel wire around some cut broomstick ends. I’ll see-saw it back and forth to carefully cut through comb.

After reading some of the experiences of beekeepers tearing apart combs I knew I wanted to avoid that.  The whole thing actually took less time than I thought…about 5 minutes.  It came apart with the minimum of damage.

I shot this video (sped up in parts to avoid the ‘yawn’ effect)

Warre hive details

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My first Warre is the one on the left.  It's the one I was really worried about not getting through the winter.

My first Warre is the one on the left. It’s the one I was really worried about not getting through the winter.  It wintered over with only one box which is now on the bottom.

I don’t know why I was so skeptical when people talked about getting honey bound.  I guess I never thought I’d get ANY honey at all because the summers on the coast are so windy and cool.  Our main goal was to provide a place for the bees to live, let them pollinate our flower and vegetable garden, and just take pleasure in watching them do their thing.

When we captured a swarm last year to inhabit the Warre, it was a small one which seemed to build the first box very quickly and then just stopped building.  I wintered over with just one box and on the advice of many more knowledgeable people, fed the bees a dry sugar paddy.

Bottom box (#1) over wintered successfully.

Bottom box (#1) over wintered successfully.  So we added box #2 in February.

On February 15, I added a second box.  When the bees wouldn’t fill it, I added some comb ladders on March 24th.   The bees immediately started building comb which is full now as can be seen below.

As soon as the comb ladders were added, the bees expanded on the combs so the queen could lay.  When it was 3/4 full, I added a third box.

Box #2  As soon as the comb ladders were added, the bees built fast so the queen could lay. When it was 3/4 full, I added a third box.

Box #3  When box #2 was 3/4 full we added this box, but comb was getting scarce so I tried using  t-posts with a melted wax coating.  Small pieces of comb was 'welded' to the top bars.

When box #2 was 3/4 full we added box #3, but comb was getting scarce so I tried using t-posts with a melted wax coating to act as a ladder. Small pieces of comb was ‘welded’ to the top bars.

Box #3...adding t-posts with small bits of comb 'welded' to them.

Box #3…adding t-posts with small bits of comb ‘welded’ to them on April 2nd.

Box #3 built up so fast we added Box #4 on May 1.  But now we have this honey bound problem as can be seen below…

Box #3 is so full of honey, it's blocking the queen from getting into the top box.

Box #3 is so full of honey, it’s blocking the queen from getting into the top box.  The t-posts worked well.

We didn’t realize we’d get any honey…and really didn’t want to take any…UNLESS there was an excess while a nectar flow was on.   Oregon’s big nectar source of blackberries is going on right now, so   we will put this box #3 on top and the empty box #4 will be inserted between #1 and #2.  If they build that out, I’ll get to harvest the honey.

Fixing the Honey-bound problem

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What to do if you need to add ‘ladders’ to your Warre box, but you don’t have any comb.  I don’t want to use any plastic foundation or anyone else’s comb.  So I’m using melted organic wax and painting it on posts hung from the top bars.  It worked last time so I feel confident it’ll work this time.

It doesn't take much wax, or much time to melt, so stick around when you do this.

It doesn’t take much wax, or much time to melt, so stick around when you do this.

It doesn't take much melted wax to coat bars and posts

Coating the bars and posts

These are how the t-posts will hang down once they are in the hive

These are how the t-post ladders will hang down once they are in the hive…trouble is I couldn’t remember if the bees build comb with less than 3/8 inch or more than 3/8 inch.

I started gathering the items together, went out to my bee hives and observed what looked like a swarm forming.  I grabbed the melting pot and spoon and started tanging.  Three days ago they headed back in when I tried tanging.  Maybe this time too, then I’ll add the extra box and maybe they’ll be happy.

At 10:07am It looks like a swarm is forming

At 10:07 am It looks like a swarm is forming on the hive I want to add the box to

Yep, a swarm is in the works...quick, get the wax melting pot and a spoon

At 10;11 am Yep, a swarm is in the works…quick, get the wax melting pot and bang on it with a spoon

At 10:15 am, it's still growing so I tang faster, wondering if I'm crazy

At 10:15 am, it’s still growing so I tang faster, wondering if I’m crazy

At 10:16 am, swarm bees are flying higher and higher

At 10:16 am, swarm bees are flying higher and higher

At 10:20 am, it almost looks like they are calming down

At 10:20 am, it almost looks like they are calming down

At 10:28 am after about 10-12 minutes of tanging, they are headed back in

At 10:28 am after about 10-12 minutes of tanging, they are headed back in

At 10-35 am, they are definitely headed back in

At 10:35 am, they are definitely headed back in

At 10-44, they've calmed down for today...what about tomorrow?

At 10:44 am, they’ve calmed down for today…what about tomorrow?

I've got to get a hive jack so I can do this right next time.

At 10:58 am I add the box with t-post ladders.  I’ve got to get a hive jack so I can do this right next time.

At 11-05 am, bees are crawling up t-post ladders already.

At 11:05 am, bees are crawling up t-post ladders already.

Day 3, the bees are still climbing the posts and a daisy-chain is visible.

More on tanging and video.

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This is what we were waiting for...Bee Beard's Prime Swarm, but it was waaay out of reach

This is what we were waiting for…Bee Beard’s Prime Swarm, but it was waaay out of reach

When we started keeping bees we read that a healthy hive will swarm, at least once every year.  Our goal was to get through the winter without feeding, medicating, or miticiding. The swarm would be our sign of success.  On a warm day March 30th, that’s what happened.  We heard the loud buzzing, came out to witness the bees heading up to the top of a nearby spruce tree.  I even tried ‘tanging,’ banging a spoon on a pan to create noise so they wouldn’t go far and would form near the ground.  I was wildly unsuccessful.  This would have been the swarm to get, but it was clearly out of reach.

Swarm #2 is within reach

Swarm #2, April 17 is within reach

Swarm number 2 is withing reach, but the 2nd log hive isn’t ready for it yet…I’ll have to stick it into the ‘back-up Warre.”

Let's try out this bamboo swarm catcher so I won't have to use a ladder

Let’s try out this bamboo swarm catcher so I won’t have to use a ladder

Well I ended up using a ladder to cut the bamboo and let the swarm drop into the white sail cloth basket.

My wife noticed some bees on the ladder...we brought it near the hive for them to crawl in, but looking closer, they were fanning.  The queen must be here.  We gathered them up and placed them into the hive.

My wife noticed some bees on the ladder…we brought it near the hive for them to crawl in, but looking closer, we noticed they were fanning. The queen must be here. We gathered them up and placed them into the hive.

After the bees were dropped in, we added the top bars with comb attached…hoping they would stay attached once I hung them in the hive.

Top bars with old comb melted on.  Quilt box in background

Top bars with old comb melted on. Quilt box in background

I had already built the sugar frame shown below.

Sugar for comb building pm a couple of sheets of blank newsprint.

1/2 inch hardware cloth will hold up sugar if using newsprint.

Premixed sugar recipe laying on a couple sheets of blank newsprint

Premixed sugar  laying on a couple sheets of blank newsprint for the Warre hive #2

We slid the sugar frame into place.

Sliding the sugar frame into place

Sliding the sugar frame into place

Next comes the quilt box.

Next comes the quilt box.

Top it off with the roof.  Matt Reed of beethinking.com, you made a nice hive kit.

Top it off with the roof. Matt Reed of beethinking.com, you made a nice hive kit.

Bees flying orientation flights.

Bees flying orientation flights.

Through the observation window we can see the bees working.  No new natural comb can be seen yet, but it won't be long.

April 23…through the observation window we can watch the bees working. No new natural comb can be seen yet, but it won’t be long.

April 26, Natural comb can be seen on Day 9.

April 26, Natural comb can be seen on Day 9.

 

Where this and other swarms are coming from…Bee Beard Log Hive.

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After I added a frame of sugar on top of the single brood box, October 25, 2012, I figured that would do it for the winter.  But at the bee meeting in January, we were advised to keep feeding into the spring.  It was important because the bees would be flying more and using up the last of the honey stores…if the weather was bad, they wouldn’t be able to fly and could starve and all our efforts would be wasted.  Just to make sure I ask the natural beekeeping forum.  I was advised to super another box.

We opened the hive on a sunny February day, adding more sugar on top of the brood box, then added an empty box on top.  Inside the empty box hung a bit of comb on two top bars that measured about 2 inches (5 cm) down.  I figured the bees would come through the slits, eat the sugar which would give them energy to build more comb.

Sugar frame added 2-15-13.  Slits cut through newsprint to allow bees access to sugar from bottom box.

Feb. 15,  More sugar  added. Slits cut through newsprint to allow bees access to sugar from bottom box.  The chunks of sugar on the right of center was all that was left of the batch we placed in October.

 February 17, 2013  Bees feeding on new sugar above brood box

February 17, 2013 Bees feeding on new sugar above brood box

The bees came up through the slits no problem, ate at the sugar, but stopped there.  They would overnight on the sugar…soon it was covered in bees.  They didn’t have any desire to build on the comb slightly above their heads.  Meanwhile the bees were crowding out the single brood box.

The box is getting crowded...March 3, 13

March 3…This box is getting very crowded…

What to do???  Okay, here’s a plan…if they like the sugar so much, let’s place the sugar frame above the empty box.  They’ll sniff out the sugar, climb up the comb to the sugar, and build out their comb.

Placing sugar frame above both boxes

March 9…Adding more sugar to the frame and placing it above top boxes

We waited a few days before we realized the bees were NOT going up to the sugar and certainly NOT building up more comb.  Meanwhile the bees were getting even more crowded in the brood box.

I go back to the beekeeping forum and notice that Bernhard has added some info about using ‘ladders,’ along with some very excellent photos taken with his expensive macro lens.

Should I try to buy foundation for the Warre…I don’t want to use plastic in my ‘natural’ hive, and I don’t want to use wax that might carry disease, but I do have a bit of comb left over from a failed hive last year which had swarmed late, not queened successfully and was finished off by the wasps.  I piece it together.

Comb 'ladders' attached to bars.  This pathetic looking comb has been in the freezer for 4 to 5 months.  My wife will be happy to have the extra room

Comb ‘ladders’ attached to bars. This pathetic looking comb has been in the freezer for 4 to 5 months.   I don’t have much left so I hope this will encourage them to climb upstairs.

Adding the first ladder

March 24…Adding the first ladder

Adding the second ladder

And the second ladder…”Honey, how about trimming the grass in front of the hive?”

A short video showing the steps involved…

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